Hinge. Don’t Cup or Bow.

Hinge your wrists; don't cup or bow them at the top of your swingThis swing thought has you focusing on making sure your wrists don’t cup or bow when you are executing your golf swing. These swing errors are easiest to spot at the top of the swing; bowed wrists look like the club is too heavy to hold in your hands and is visible through your hands falling to the ground a little. Cupped wrists look like the opposite and are instead visible through your hands arcing up towards the sky.

What it promotes

Quite simply, correctly hinging your wrists promotes a straight ball flight. It does so because the wrists are positioned as they should and are not ultimately exerting sidespin onto the ball.

What it tries to cure

Golfers who have a tendency to hook the ball should check to make sure their wrists are not bowing. Indeed, bowed wrists promote a closed clubface at impact, and a counter-clockwise sidespin.

Likewise, golfers who have a tendency to slice the ball should check to make sure their wrists are not cupping. Indeed, cupped wrists promote an open clubface at impact, and a clockwise sidespin.

Why it works

When wrists are bowing the club is open at the top and will be rotated back during the downswing into what is often a closed clubface, ultimately resulting in a hook.

Similarly, when wrists are cupping the club is closed at the top and will be rotated back during the downswing into what is often an open clubface, ultimately resulting in a slice.

When is it most useful?

This swing key is essential for all types of swing that require your wrists to move. It is even more critical for long shots such as those hit with a driver where faulty wrist movements can lead to wayward shots at a high cost to the scorecard.